Now Reading
These Two Coveted Ford GTs Might Fetch Nearly $2 Million at Public sale

These Two Coveted Ford GTs Might Fetch Nearly $2 Million at Public sale

Two important Ford GTs headline Broad Arrow’s upcoming Amelia Auction 2024 at the Ritz-Carlton Amelia Island in Florida. Taking place March 1 and 2, the event is a highlight of the Amelia, formerly known as the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. Both the auction and the concours are now owned by Hagerty, further evidence that the business-end of the collector-car landscape continues to consolidate and change.

Among Ford enthusiasts, few cars from the modern era are as sought after as the GTs spanning model years 2005 and 2006, and newer versions produced from 2017 through 2023. Both examples crossing the block are rare Heritage Editions, each distinguished by their Gulf Oil livery—Gulf Blue with orange stripes. In celebration of its 2003 centenary, Ford began building the Ford GT the following year as an homage to the Ford GT40. The latter model took motorsport by storm throughout the 1960s, decimating Ferrari at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans with a 1-2-3 win—the subject of the blockbuster film Ford v Ferrari—followed by consecutive victories from 1967 to 1969.

The 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition being offered through Broad Arrow Actions in March.

Ryan Merrill, courtesy of Broad Arrow Auctions

Designer Camilo Pardo, under the direction of J Mays, created the concept car that led to the production version of the early-21st century Ford GT, which by anyone’s estimation remains one of the most successful “resto-adaptations” in recent memory. Bigger in every dimension than the original GT40, and at 43 inches, 3 inches taller, the Ford GT made no pretense of being a race car, but rather a powerful two-seater in the spirit of the best European supercars of its decade.

The cockpit of a 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition supercar.

The cockpit of the 2006 Ford GT provides an interesting analog contrast to the supercars of today.

Ryan Merrill, courtesy of Broad Arrow Auctions

It could be argued that the Ford GT was America’s first modern supercar. Weighing less than 3,500 pounds, largely due to an aluminum space frame and aluminum bodywork, it’s powered by a mid-rear mounted, 5.4-liter, supercharged V-8 engine developing 550 hp, mated to a Ricardo six-speed transaxle. Its power-to-weight ratio and good balance make the Ford GT a memorably dynamic car to drive, while providing interesting analog contrast to the more complicated supercars of today. The Ford GT turned out to be a huge success, with a total of 4,038 examples built between 2004 and 2006. This 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition is one of just 383 built with this trim package, and shows only 1,238 miles at the time of cataloging. The car’s rear-strut tower brace is signed by Pardo, a nice personal touch sure to be appreciated by the new owner.

A 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition supercar.

Also set to cross the Broad Arrow auction block, this 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition has a top speed of 216 mph.

Ryan Merrill, courtesy of Broad Arrow Auctions

The more recent Ford GT, with about 1,350 built for model years 2017 through 2023, is good for 216 mph and designed to win races. To that end, the No.68 Ford GT of Ford Chip Ganassi Racing won first place at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the LMGTE Pro class for the 2016 season. While certainly street legal, Ford’s second iteration of its GT supercar is an unapologetically brutal and purpose-built machine. Its 647 hp, twin-turbo EcoBoost V-6 engine is an outlier in a world of V-12 and hybrid-electric hypercars, but it works brilliantly, mounted rear-midship in the carbon-fiber monocoque chassis.

This 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition is not even broken in, showing just 58 miles on the digital odometer at the time of cataloging. It’s one of only 50 Heritage Edition examples produced for 2019, and comes with the window sticker, a carbon-fiber specification box, and comprehensive factory documentation.

A 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition supercar.

At the time of its cataloging, this car had only 58 miles on the digital odometer.

Ryan Merrill, courtesy of Broad Arrow Auctions

Those interested in provenance will appreciate that both cars being sold come from the same collection, and most importantly, will be offered without reserve. The 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition has a high-end estimate of $650,000, while the 2019 version is estimated to fetch as much as $1.25 million.

See Also

Click here for more photos of these 2006 and 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition supercars.

A 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition supercar (left) and a 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition supercar (right).

The 2006 and 2019 examples of the Ford GT Heritage Edition supercar being offered at Broad Arrow’s Amelia Auction in March.

Ryan Merrill, courtesy of Broad Arrow Auctions

Source: Robb Report

View Comments (0)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Copyright © MetaMedia™ Capital Inc, All right reserved

Scroll To Top